Major New Book – Behind the Scenes of John Ford’s THEY WERE EXPENDABLE (1945)

John Ford established himself as a major film director during the silent film era with classics such as THE IRON HORSE (1924), 3 BAD MEN (1926), and FOUR SONS (1928), among others. Then Ford made some of the finest films of the talkie era such as THE INFORMER (1935), THE PRISONER OF SHARK ISLAND (1936) and GRAPES OF WRATH (1940), and many, many others. This book takes us behind the scenes of one of his best films – THEY WERE EXPENDABLE (1945) – using unpublished photos that only today are being seen for the first time in 70 years.
They Were Expendable

The stars – Robert Montgomery, Donna Reed and John Wayne:
they-were-expendable-from-left-robert-montgomery-donna-reed-john-wayne-1945

Ward Bond, John Wayne and Robert Montgomery:
Poster - They Were Expendable_08

Poster - They Were Expendable_05

Poster - They Were Expendable_06
Author Lou Sabini and photographer Nicholas Scutti have provided a major addition to the John Ford Bibliography. This volume will continue to be a unique and important account of the filmmaker’s art and skill for many years to come.

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2 CommentsLeave a comment

  1. As a silent film buff I REALLY appreciate the effort you put in coloring the stills, but as a graphic designer I highly stress that you tone down the saturation a notch or two(you want to avoid making them look too pink or too tan), also filtering can be your best friend(I’m not talking Instagram filters, I’m talking photoshop with a transparent color layer(s) overlayed(or soft lighted)

    • Thanks very much for your comments. If you refer to the images in the post on THEY WERE EXPENDABLE, none of that coloring was my work. The lobby cards were originally colored by MGM. I would be interested in your comments on other posts where I personally did the color transfer.


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