The Nativity Sequence from BEN-HUR (1925)

A Merry Christmas to All!

Published in: on December 24, 2016 at 1:21 PM  Leave a Comment  

Christmas with Lionel Barrymore

Merry Christmas, folks. I am reposting this from my Facebook group, Silent Films Today. Enjoy!

Christmas with Lionel Barrymore
– Mr. B’s many versions of “A Christmas Carol” are all over the Internet (thankfully) but here are two commercial recordings of less well-known performances he made in 1950:

lionel-b-ad-copy

Published in: on December 23, 2016 at 6:55 PM  Leave a Comment  

Fantastic Camera Shot from THE EAGLE (1925) – Rudolph Valentino

This superb costume adventure of Old Russia set during the reign of Czarina Catherine the Great offered an eye-popping camera shot as it traveled down a huge banquet table. Here is an on the set production photo showing how it was filmed. Seated on the right looking into the camera are Rudolph Valentino and Vilma Banky. Seated on top of the bridge is director Clarence Brown. Color is by yours truly:
rudy-on-the-set-color-final-final

And here is the shot as it appeared in the film:

Published in: on October 11, 2016 at 8:11 PM  Leave a Comment  

“Silents Please” – the Legendary 1960 TV Series – BLOOD AND SAND (1922) starring Rudolph Valentino and Nita Naldi

In 1960, the baby boomer generation got a real treat when Paul Killiam produced his legendary television series, “Silents Please.” After decades of ridicule and jokes by Hollywood itself, Mr. Killiam showed the younger generation what silent films were really like and the series became a surprise hit! Long-forgotten stars, some of whom were still living in 1960, suddenly became familiar names to the boomers: Mary Pickford, Buster Keaton, Lillian Gish, Gloria Swanson, and others found themselves in demand to discuss their silent film work.

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The image quality of these films back in the day can’t compare to the clarity and sharpness of their 21st century Blu-ray editions – not to mention the addition of color tints and stereo scores absent from 1960s TV broadcasts. But seeing one of these episodes again today recalls the excitement of discovering these films for the first time over a half century ago.

Here is Paul Killiam’s expertly edited and narrated (by himself) edition of the 1922 blockbuster, BLOOD AND SAND, starring Rudolph Valentino, Nita Naldi, and Lila Lee. In 26 minutes Killiam wisely lets the images speak for themselves and limits his commentary to just the essentials. The story is a faithful adaptation of the best-selling novel by Vicente Blasco Ibanez. The Spanish title is translated as BLOOD IN THE ARENA. I added a color tint just for fun:

blood-and-sand-26ebbc50

Behind the scenes with director Fred Niblo:

Valentino B&S Final_Final-1_edited-1.jpg

Rudy’s costume as it exists today:

rudy-costume

Great Poster Art:

val-blood-sand

 

LIGHT WINES AND BEARDED LADIES (1926)

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Published in: on October 2, 2016 at 12:04 PM  Leave a Comment  

HER SISTER FROM PARIS (1925)

Constance Talmadge and Ronald Colman:
her-sister-from-paris

Published in: on September 25, 2016 at 11:38 AM  Leave a Comment  

TWO TARS (1928) Laurel & Hardy Classic!

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Published in: on September 24, 2016 at 12:05 AM  Leave a Comment  

MGM Studio Tour 1925

 

Published in: on September 23, 2016 at 9:46 PM  Comments (1)  

Happy 4th of July!

Rin Tin Tin and Betty Compson as the Spirit of Liberty circa 1925:
Rin Tin Tin and Betty Compson as the Spirit of Liberty Final
Pastiche compliments of Yours Truly.

Published in: on July 2, 2014 at 9:33 PM  Leave a Comment  

2013 – Old Hollywood in Color in Review

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2013 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

The concert hall at the Sydney Opera House holds 2,700 people. This blog was viewed about 18,000 times in 2013. If it were a concert at Sydney Opera House, it would take about 7 sold-out performances for that many people to see it.

Lt. Humphrey Bogart tells his men, “Boys, by my calculations the New Year should arrive at about midnight.” CHINA CLIPPER (1936)

Bogart_CHINA CLIPPER 1936 copy_edited-1

Click here to see the complete report.

Published in: on December 31, 2013 at 3:34 PM  Leave a Comment  
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